Sleep Health FAQs

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Category: Sleep Health

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Category: Sleep Health

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  • Suppression of skeletal muscle tone
  • A sleep onset REM period
  • Dissociated REM sleep
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    About half of people with sleep apnea are overweight. The condition is more likely among men than women and in older people than younger people — although children with enlarged tonsils are at risk.

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  • The most common treatment is a CPAP machine. This is basically a machine that sits beside the bed. The patient wears a mask that fits across the face. The machine blows air into the nose all night.
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    1. Oral Appliance therapy involves the selection, design, fitting and use of a specially designed oral appliance that, when worn during sleep, maintains an opened, unobstructed airway in the throat. Oral appliances that treat snoring and obstructive sleep apnea are devices worn in the mouth similar to orthodontic retainers or sports mouth-guards. They have several advantages over other forms of therapy. Oral appliances are comfortable and easy to wear and care for. They are small and convenient, making them easy to carry with you when you travel. Treatment with oral appliances is reversible and non-invasive.
     
    1. There are a few different kinds of surgeries that can be performed in the attempt of resolving sleep apnea or severe snoring.
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    Category: Sleep Health

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    Category: Sleep Health

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    Sleep Apnea is a medical condition that causes a person to actually stop breathing while asleep. These interruptions of oxygen cause a wide variety of symptoms and is linked to some serious conditions.

    Apnea sufferers can stop breathing as many as 40 times per minute. They awaken feeling as though they had little or no sleep, which is actually true as they’ve been fighting for oxygen all night.

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  • Mask Size, fit, and comfort are the most important considerations when choosing a PAP mask.
  • If the mask doesn’t meet your breathing needs, or if it isn’t comfortable, or doesn’t fit you, you might not stick with your PAP therapy.
  • Take the time to go over the best mask for you with your equipment provider staff
  • Don’t be afraid if you change your mind later and want to try a different mask.
  • Make sure to tell your DME therapist if you are an active sleeper so that you get the most secure mask possible
  • Make sure to tell your DME therapist if you are an active sleeper so that you get the most secure mask possible.
  • Tell your DME therapist if you are claustrophobic or if there are areas of your face that are easily irritated.
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    A BiPAP machine will benefit you If:

    • You Have a High Pressure Setting
    • Low Oxygen Levels
    • CPAP has Failed to Provide Adequate Treatment
    • If You are Diagnosed with a Lung Disorder such as COPD
    • If you have certain Neuromuscular Disorders
    • If You have a Cardiopulmonary Disorder such as Congestive Heart Failure
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    PAP is not oxygen–it is merely pressurized room air. It only causes your airway to open, it does not deliver air for you to breathe. It is not a ventilator. It’s easy to see why people confuse the two. When sleep apnea occurs, a person’s oxygen level drops. However, the first line of defense for sleep apnea is not oxygen it is PAP. In rare cases, such as with sleep apnea patients who also have COPD, something known as supplemental oxygen is given along with PAP, usually through the PAP mask by way of extra tubing. Back to FAQ main page  ]]>

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    From the AHI rating chart here, we see that an index less that 5 is considered normal. For an Apnea-Hypopnea Index (or AHI) from 5 to 15 denotes mild sleep apnea. Fifteen to 30 is moderate, while a greater than 30 AHI is considered severe.
    • AHI = sum of the number of apneas (pauses in breathing) plus the number of hypopneas (periods of shallow breathing) occurring, on average, each hour.
    • Apneas and hypopneas, collectively called events, must last at least 10 seconds to count as events.
    • The AHI is calculated by dividing the number of events by the number of hours of sleep.
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    Category: Sleep Health
  • Due to various nasal problems, it is getting increasingly harder to wear a mask. I have tried 6 different ones, but none are right. As I have not only apnea but also hypopnea (low oxygen) does anyone know if the oral devices help the hypopnea?

  • I recently changed from a nasal mask to a full face mask. The reason was I was getting a dry mouth . However my API was running from .1 to 4.0 now with the full face mask it has be 11.0 to 12.0 – can you tell me what is causing this

  • Is the reading of 2.5 for events per hour considered low/medium/or high?
    What does the decimal ( . 5 ) represent?

  • If one’s AHI is 2.5 events per hour, what does the decimal point *(.5) represent? Is this reading considered low/medium/high?

  • I received a nasal mask, and was asked if I wanted a chin strap. I was told if I snored and breathed through my mouth, it wouldn’t do any good. I took the chin strap, but went without the first night (last night). My AHI over 10 hours was 3.9, so I’m thinking I don’t need to use it. What do you think?

    • If you are breathing through your mouth and your mouth is extremely dry when you wake up I would recommend the chin strap. You will know you are breathing through your mouth if it is dry. Hope this helps.

      • I breath through my mouth often at night due to nasal passages that easily get stuffy. My doctor prescribed me a mask that goes over my mouth as well.

  • I was diagnosed with sarcoidosis about 7 years ago. I immediately fought against EXTREME fatigue. My pulmonary doctor recently told me that the sarcoidosis has been in remission for a couple of years now. I went and had a sleep study done. It revealed that I had 131 episodes an hour. Oxygen dropped as low as 60 and I stopped breathing up to 32.5 seconds. The doc said I am basically not sleeping at all. I got my CPAP machine and the next morning I felt so refreshed. It’s scary to think about how long my cells may not have had an opportunity to rejuvenate. I pray that any damage can be reversed with dedicated use of the CPAP machine.

  • I have sleep apnea my machine is set on 8 but my air pressure was drying out my nose so i call where i pickrd up machine and she told me to turn it up and i put it on 4 the air pressure is this right

    • I suggest you to buy Philips Dreammaker with Humidifier attached to it. I bought this machine, fully Auto Pressure, I feel how beautiful the human invention is! I have Bluetooth attached to my mobile phone, Morning you just need to synchronise to get the data overnight, take a screenshot and store day by day in your phone in a separate folder.

    • You should never adjust your air pressure you should only be adjusting your humidity if your air pressure is set to 8 you should not change it you should discuss it with your doctor however if you called and they told you to turn it up they were more than likely speaking about the humidity level and that you can adjust on your own my machine comes set to 4 standard or by default I actually turned it up to 5 to get a little more humidity to stop B from drying out this is a good setting for me

  • Is .5 and 5 the same measure? What does it mean when your number increases from .5 to 1.0? The decimal point is confusing. Where do these numbers fall on the chart from normal to severe?

    • It’s simple if you sleep 2 hours but only have one event during that two hours it will show up as point five or if you see point five and you slept 8 hours that means you had four events if you slept 8 hours and only had two events it would show up as .25

  • What is the difference between AHI and RDI (respiratory disturbance index). I did some basic research and it seems like RDI is considered “more accurate” but the clear differences are not elucidated very clearly. Any small clarifications would be greatly appreciated.

  • i started on a bi-pap machine 30 days ago. i had a terrible time for nearly the whole month in tryat ing to make the full mask work. I started calling to complain. I even went back in to the provider to see if the mask fit. finally, the manager, a respiratory therapist heard my pleas and called. she was at my house within the hour and gave me a different mask which has worked 100%. In the last 10 days, i have had 100% mask fit. The AHI is up and down and i dont know what makes the difference in higher or lower, but i think i am sleeping better and will hopefully improve as time goes by. i no longer dread putting on the machine and i no longer have red marks and pain from the ill-fitting mask. do not settle for an inferior fitting when you can get relief if the techs will only take the time that this manager did with me

    • Paula, it will take time for your apneas to start to decline. Your brain is still getting used to having air at night. I started my bipap last April, and after about a month, I was still getting 13 apneas an hour, but more alert and awake during the day. After a couple more months it dropped to 10, and after 8 months, I now average around 6.5 per hour. Still having good nights and bad, but that is part of the process. Hang in there.

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    “a” + “pnea” = apnea Means no breath

    “hypo” + “pnea” = hypopnea Means little breath

    In Latin, “pnea” means breath. Translated, “a” is no and “hypo” means little. Put that all together and you have apnea (no breath) and hypopnea (little breath). While it makes a lot of sense that apneas are more critical and can result in bigger negative changes to the body and general health, hypopneas also result in changes. this means that both are important to understand, measure and track for your therapy So, we know that apneic events mean there is no breath that occurs for at least 10 seconds. Hypopneic events are counted as a reduction in airflow by ≥30%, and the drop in the airflow lasts greater than 10 seconds.  There is a ≥3% oxygen desaturation or the event is associated with an arousal. An arousal from sleep means a brief awakening. People may or may not be aware of the arousals and simply drift back into sleep—until the next event occurs! Think about this happening HUNDREDS of times a night! It would make anyone have excessive daytime sleepiness the following day! Not to mention organs being oxygen deprived from breathing events! Alarming thoughts, don’t you agree? Back to FAQ main page  ]]>

    Category: Sleep Health

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    We know a fellow that snored so loudly, he was evicted from his apartment building. Neighbors above, below, aside- all could hear his snore vibrating the walls. He did snore for a time and was not tested for any sleep disorder…Until he drove his truck off a steep embankment. Miraculously he was not injured, but once he had a sleep study it was revealed his apnea was severe. Once a sleep specialist physician said, “You can bet that snoring is a cousin to sleep apnea. Once you have the snoring, its cousin is sleep apnea is eventually showing up at the family reunion!”

    • It is linked to many other health problems
    • It can ruin sleep for bed partners, roommates…and in some cases, neighbors!
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    help you take care of your health, prepare for medical tests, and take your medicines or therapies the right way. Every time you talk with a doctor, nurse, technician, or pharmacist, use the questions to better understand your health… #1. What is my main problem? #2. What do I need to do? And #3. Why is it important for me to do this? SOURCE: Adapted from the National Network of Libraries of Medicine of the National Institutes of Health Back to FAQ main page  ]]>

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